whether you need a planning permission or not for your renovation project, build a shed in your backyard without getting a planning permission, properties that require prior planning permission, internal works that do not need planning permission, unnecessary to secure for a planning permission whenever replacing broken windows and doors

Do You Need A Planning Permission For That Project?


Are you going to renovate your house soon? If so, find out whether you’ll need a planning permission for your project.

The quest to obtain planning permission is similar to an epic. The process is very long and you’ll have to face many obstacles before you get to the end.

Sometimes, all your hard work would even be useless when you realise in the middle of the process that you don’t need one in the first place. If you don’t want to end up in this scenario, read up on these simple guidelines to find out whether you need a planning permission or not for your renovation project:

Indoors

Almost all renovations that you’ll conduct inside of your house don’t need a planning permission.
Some common internal works that do not need planning permission are loft and garage conversions, building new staircases, bathrooms, and kitchens, as well as rewiring work.

Fences, gates, and walls

Planning permission is required to all fences, gates, and walls which are:

  • Next to a road and over 1 meter high;
  • Over 2 meters high (even though it’s not next to a road);
  • Created for a listed property; and
  • Serving as a boundary with a listed building.

Windows and doors

Like indoor renovations it’s also unnecessary to secure for a planning permission whenever replacing broken windows and doors, except when the building or property is listed. Repairs done on any listed property requires prior listed building consent and an additional Building Control approval for window repairs.

Extensions

Constructing an extension for your house is considered a permitted development, so you won’t have to worry about securing a planning permission as long as:

  • The materials used is similar to the ones used in the original structure;
  • The extension won’t be equal to half of the original houses’ area;
  • It will not go beyond the highest part of the roof;
  • The maximum height of a single-story extension won’t extend beyond the rear wall of the original house by more than three metres;
  • Extensions of more than one storey do not extend beyond the rear wall of the original house by more than three metres;
  • Two-storey extensions are no closer than seven metres to rear boundary; and
  • It will not include verandas, balconies or raised platforms.

Garages, sheds, and other out buildings

whether you need a planning permission or not for your renovation project, build a shed in your backyard without getting a planning permission, properties that require prior planning permission, internal works that do not need planning permission, unnecessary to secure for a planning permission whenever replacing broken windows and doors

Garages and the like are usually considered permitted developments.

Garages and the like are also considered permitted developments, thus you can build a shed in your backyard without getting a planning permission provided that the size of your shed is very reasonable or roughly around 4 metres.

It’s important that your outhouse doesn’t take up more than half of the land around the original property to qualify as a permitted development.

This article is a good jump off point in determining the basic group of properties that require prior planning permission, but more comprehensive information can also be accessed at www.planningportal.co.uk.

In the event that your property does not fall under permitted developments, the next step is to schedule a meeting with a local planning officer and submit all the requirements for a planning permission. During this meeting, the officer may ask you important details about your property and your proposed construction; and you may also be asked to pay a certain fee for the service.

As a last note, whether you need a planning permission or not, don’t ever forget to keep the renovations in compliance with existing building code provisions.

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